Authentic Syracusan Silver Coin Pendant depicting the Nymph Arethusa with dolphins

€930,00
  • • Handmade 100% Made in Italy • Authentic Syracusan Silver Coin 4th cent. BC • Band material: Sterling Silver 925

An authentic Syracuse coin was set in this pendant, minted by Dionysus I (405-367 BC), depicting on one side the Nymph Arethusa with dolphins; on the other a charioteer driving horses and a Nike flying.

In Greek mythology, Arethusa (Greek: Ἀρέθουσα) was a nymph and daughter of Nereus (making her a Nereid), who fled from her home in Arcadia beneath the sea and came up as a freshwater fountain on the island of Ortygia in Syracuse, Sicily.
The myth of her transformation begins in Arcadia when she came across a clear stream and began bathing, not knowing it was the river god Alpheus, who flowed down from Arcadia through Elis to the sea. He fell in love during their encounter, but she fled after discovering his presence and intentions, as she wished to remain a chaste attendant of Artemis. After a long chase, she prayed to her goddess to ask for protection. Artemis hid her in a cloud, but Alpheus was persistent. She began to perspire profusely from fear and soon transformed into a stream. Artemis then broke the ground allowing Arethusa another attempt to flee. Her stream traveled under the sea to the island of Ortygia, but Alpheus flowed through the sea to reach her and mingle with her waters. Virgil augurs for Arethusa a salt-free passage beneath the sea on the condition that, before departing, she grants him songs about troubled loves, not those in her future, but those of Virgil's friend and contemporary, the poet Cornelius Gallus, whom Virgil imagines dying from unrequited love beneath the famous mountains of Arcadia, Maenalus and Lycaeus.During Demeter's search for her daughter Persephone, Arethusa entreated Demeter to discontinue her punishment of Sicily for her daughter's disappearance. She told the goddess that while traveling in her stream below the earth, she saw her daughter as the queen of Hades

The Roman writer Ovid called Arethusa by the name "Alpheias" because her stream was believed to have subterranean communication with the river Alpheus, in Peloponnesus. A legend of the period, still told in Sicily today, is that a wooden cup tossed into the River Alpheus will reappear in the Fountain of Arethusa in Syracuse.